Books about Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS)

3,000 Pulses Later: A Memoir of Surviving Depression Without Medication describes how Martha Rhodes, a successful advertising executive, wife, and mother with a seemingly ideal life succumbed to depression and overdosed on Xanax and alcohol in a failed suicide attempt. The memoir describes her challenges with untreated, drug-resistant depression and the struggle to find an alternative to the drugs that failed to relieve her symptoms.

After a grueling stay in a psychiatric ward and many months of trial-and-error medications, Rhodes pursued TMS, Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation, the FDA-cleared, safe and proven-effective alternative to ECT (electroconvulsive therapy) and ineffective drugs.

3,000 Pulses Later shares how the road back to health with TMS returned her to an even better place than where she started. Rhodes now manages her depression with TMS therapy and without the side effects attributable to antidepressant medications.

What's thisThe mainstays of brain imaging techniques have been positron emission tomography (PET), functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), magnetoencephalography (MEG), and event-related potentials (ERPs). These methods all record direct or indirect measures of brain activity and correlate the activity patterns with behavior. But to go beyond the correlations established by these techniques and prove the necessity of an area for a given function, cognitive neuroscientists need to be able to reverse engineer the brain—i.e., to selectively remove components from information processing and assess their impact on the output.

This book is about transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), a technique that emerged during the same period as neuroimaging and has made it possible to reverse engineer the human brain's role in behavioral and cognitive functions. The subject areas that can be studied using TMS run the gamut of cognitive psychology—attention, perception, awareness, eye movements, action selection, memory, plasticity, language, numeracy, and priming. The book presents an overview of historical attempts at magnetic brain stimulation, ethical considerations of the technique's use, basic technical and practical information, the results of numerous TMS studies, and a discussion of the future of TMS in the armamentarium of cognitive neuropsychology. item about? What makes it interesting? Write a catchy description to grab your audience's attention...

Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) treatment is increasingly being used in the management of patients with depression. Nevertheless, considerable ignorance still exists about the treatment in general psychiatric practice. This concise clinical guide will serve as a reference and practical tool for clinicians working with or learning about this treatment technique. The opening chapters provide basic information on the history and development of rTMS treatment and its mechanism of action. Use of the treatment in depression is then addressed in detail, with explanation of the evidence base and discussion of a variety of clinical issues. Side-effects of treatment are explored, and careful consideration is given to the establishment of rTMS treatment programs and the training of clinicians. The final chapters will provide a brief overview of potential rTMS applications in other psychiatric conditions and some background on related treatments.

1 / 1

Please reload

You May Also Be Interested In

TMS in the News
TMS Research
TMS Downloads
Show More

Schedule An Appointment

Southeastern Psychiatric Associates 

1093 North Main Street

Randolph, MA 02368

Carney Hospital

2100 Dorchester Ave.

7th Floor

Dorchester, MA 02124

Cambridge

875 Massachusetts Ave.

Suite 54

Cambridge, MA 02139

  • Black Facebook Icon
  • Black Twitter Icon
  • Black Instagram Icon

© 2018 by SOUTHEASTERN PSYCHIATRIC ASSOCIATES